Lollipop

This week I have chosen a rather silly song however the origin of how the tune came about makes for an interesting story. 

In 1958, co-writers Julius Dixson and Beverly Ross were scheduled to have a songwriting session. Dixson was late explaining that the reason for the delay was that his daughter got a lollipop stuck in her hair. Ross, inspired by his tale apparently sat down at the piano and created a version of “Lollipop” right then and there. Beverly Ross ended up making a recording of the tune with Dixson’s neighbour, a 13 year old boy Ronald Gum. Their recording act’s name was Ronald and Ruby, an alias apparently chosen to hide the fact that they were an interracial duo. RCA records released the song and it climbed to #20 on the charts.

Later in 1958, “Lollipop” was covered by the American female accappela vocal quartet, The Chordettes. Their version, which became a huge hit all over the world is the one I use in my classes because its the most recognizable to my older adult participants. The unaccompanied clapping introduction followed by the vocals gradually coming in one by one as they sing the one word chorus is playful and percussive. 

“Lollipop” provides an excellent opportunity for lighthearted simple choreography. Also, there is a loud pop sound that is part of the musical hook which I often try to accompany by doing a finger pop with my mouth in sync with the recording. Never underestimate the value of adding a little entertainment to your classes! 

THE CHORDETTES ALSO KNOWN FOR THEIR BIGGEST HIT "MR. SANDMAN" 

THE CHORDETTES ALSO KNOWN FOR THEIR BIGGEST HIT "MR. SANDMAN"